gender

All posts tagged gender

“Murder Me…Become a Man”: Establishing the Masculine Care Circle in Young Adult Dystopia by Jessica Seymour.

This source looks at the different way male YA-dystopian characters care for the people around them. New-age YA dystopias show masculine gender performance in a caring role as opposed to the arrogant fighters typical of other media. The characters form a “care circle” of whom the male will care for. This “care circle” is different than the more common “justice perspective” which is a more masculine trait that is concerned with the greater good. The men in YA dystopia don’t exhibit the traits of hyper-masculinity so often seen in other literature. This source examines how gender roles compare between YA dystopia and other genres. This comparison will be important when looking at literature intended for different age groups. It gives plenty of examples of different male characters in YA dystopia, how they interact, and what the effect is on the reader. One thing to remember when reading this source is that it only looks at YA dystopia so it will be important to make sure that other sources are looking at literature/media that is aimed at both younger and older audiences. This source seems really credible. I didn’t detect any bias in the author’s voice, Reading Psychology is reputable, and it’s very up to date, being written last year. The source uses lots of textual evidence to support its claim, and is great to use to find parts of novels that have examples of the “care circle” being cared for. It moves through each facet of the relationship between a male character and his care circle, examining how the care circle is created, and the different relationships between the male and everyone he helps care for. The projects that I saw in the conference presentations that would directly benefit from using this source include Fatma’s, Matthew’s, and Teresa’s.

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http://fandomlybookish.blogspot.com/2014/03/divergent-11-new-movie-stills-of-theo.html

Google+ Circles: Making them Work for You

Dystopian literature is a pivotal tool in critiquing current society and providing us examples, although some more extreme than others, of what could happen if we don’t change or improve our current society’s flaws. With this idea in mind, dystopian novels often try to create realistic worlds in which we can clearly see parallels between the society depicted and our own.  Therefore, the political and social climate the novel was written plays a key role in how these divisions of race, class, and gender are represented in dystopias. For my conference and research paper, I will be using my novel The Selection and other dystopian novels written throughout recent history to analyze the difference between female and male depiction in dystopian literature and how situations in society at the time they were written impacted this representation.

Women have been struggling to gain equality in our society for much of the past two hundred years. Through historical periods such as the suffrage movement or women’s liberation movement, men and women have been given more equal roles in society, yet today divisions still exist. As dystopian novels often critique the flaws of our society, when our society refuses to recognize the genders as equal, these novels provide examples of the downfalls of this lack of recognition, or the benefits when one challenges the recognition.

More recently, though men and women are more equal than ever, there still exists gaps in equality between the genders. Currently, difference in wage, political representation, and statistics in employment reinforce the gaps that exist in gender. Stereotypes and social norms still influence society’s thought and perception of the two genders and therefore the fight more recently has been toward changing the social climate of our society and the views of the genders.

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My independent reading book, published recently in 2012, The Selection, the strong, feminist lead America challenges stereotypes given by her society, where men are the providers and women are valued moreover for beauty than intelligence. The Selection emulates The Bachelor, where one man chooses from a pool of many women. The Selection seems to be a criticism of such shows like The Bachelor that objectify women.

Dystopian literature allows us to reflect on the current state our society and provides a warning of how portions of our society could worsen. In order to truly understanding the gender systems in dystopias, we must analyze the society at the time By doing so, we can deduce the root of the depiction of gender in the novel and how the dystopia seeks to address or overcome the flaw in gender divisions plaguing society.

Works Cited

Cass, Kiera. The Selection. New York, HarperTeen, 2012.

For the upcoming presentation, I will be discussing the negative consequences of systemic oppression on individuals in YA dystopias. My paper is called Race, Gender, and Oppression: How Invisible Forces Affect Individual Experiences in Dystopias.

I will begin by giving a brief explanation of the term, oppression, and the argument that oppression should not be perceived as a uniform force that affects everyone in the same way. In my research, I have come up with logical and sound evidence that uniform oppression is impossible in societies that are hierarchal by nature. Throughout my presentation, I hope to topple the common misperception that everyone suffers to the same extent in dystopias.

To provide evidence for my claim, I will be analyzing several characters to demonstrate the effects of race and gender on individual experiences. I will explore how race and gender can affect a person’s standing in society and how oppression is not only a byproduct of totalitarian rule, but also a byproduct of an ingrained social hierarchy – based on race, gender, and other factors.

Specifically, for this presentation, I will draw examples from Legend, Little Brother, and The Handmaid’s Tale to examine the lives of characters who are disadvantaged by systemic oppression. In each dystopian novel, there are characters who are oppressed in different ways, depending on his or her background. For example, in Little Brother, some characters are disadvantaged by their race/ethnicity, while in The Handmaid’s Tale, female characters are subordinated and live in a society controlled by men. Legend is a foray into another type of oppression that divides characters by socioeconomic status.

After analyzing characters individually, I will then analyze characters as a group. In the second half of my presentation, I will be comparing and/or contrasting the experiences of privileged characters to those of characters who are less fortunate. I will explain why characters think and behave the way they do, and why some characters cannot afford to act as rashly as other characters. To end my presentation, I will reiterate the main points of my argument and (hopefully) leave the audience convinced.

Works Cited:

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