Assignments

English 1102 (Storytelling) Projects and Requirements

(This is a general summary of assignments which will be made more specific throughout the semester.)

Participation:  10%

Goals:

  • Apply strategies for addressing academic and professional audiences.
  • Explore individual and collaborative processes in multicultural and international contexts.
  • Construct, select, and deploy information based on interpretation and critique of the accuracy, bias, credibility, authority, and appropriateness of sources.
  • “Read and respond to various texts for purposes of interpretation, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and judgment.”
  • Distinguish and evaluate multimodal communication —WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal).

Participation will be based on the following:

  • Preparation for class
  • Discussion in class
  • Participation in activities and practice sessions

 

Assignments: Blog, Peer Review, Reflections:   15%

Goals:

  •  “Understand rhetorical contexts for writing by establishing the writer’s role, the audience, and the purpose of the project.”
  • “Use conventions of writing mechanics, usage, and style to communicate effectively for the given audience, purpose, and format.”
  • Understand registers and variations within discourses.
  • Apply strategies for addressing academic and professional audiences.
  • Create artifacts that demonstrate the synergy of rhetorical elements.
  •  “Approach writing as a way to think and communicate ideas to others.”
  • “Use recursive processes that include collecting information, focusing, ordering, drafting, revising, and editing.”
  • “Demonstrate the techniques and skills of research, integration of source material, and documentation.”
  • Construct, select, and deploy information based on interpretation and critique of the accuracy, bias, credibility, authority, and appropriateness of sources.
  •  “Adjust writing to a variety of contexts, including electronic environments.”
  • “Read and respond to various texts for purposes of interpretation, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and judgment.”
  • Distinguish and evaluate multimodal communication —WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal).

Blog:

Once per week for ten weeks of the class (as indicated in the Course Schedule), you must create a Blog that responds to any one of the following prompts.  You may mix and match as you wish (and yes, you can respond to the same prompt more than once if you want).  Try to be clever and interesting.

  1. Discuss the readings, expanding on the discourse from class.
  2. Discuss an in-class activity.
  3. Contribute and discuss an outside source relevant to stories and storytelling (maybe something you found on the web or heard about in another class, etc.).
  4. Write a Mini-Saga: a story that is only fifty words long (no more, no less). Like all stories, it must have a beginning, a middle, and an end.
  5. Describe and respond to a story you encountered this week.
  6. Pick an opening line at random and create a story based on it.
  7. Pick a photo and create a story based on it.
  8. Watch a group of people on campus somewhere, and then ask yourself: “Who are these people?” Tell their story.
  9. Discuss how a type of social media tells a story—Facebook for example?
  10. Relate how you have inserted story (or noticed someone else insert story) this week?
  11. Create an experience story based on scientific fact.

Your responses, whenever possible, should incorporate text and images (and if possible video, links, etc.).  If not specified in the prompt, then the response needs to be 150-200 words.

Responses:  In addition, once per week, you must respond to the comments of at least one of your peers in a thoughtful and thought-provoking manner (so “Great entry!” would not be acceptable).  These responses must be at least one paragraph in length.  You can pose questions, comment on ideas, discuss issues that you find interesting or confusing, etc.  In these responses, it must be clear that you read the original entries.

Blog Grading: Blogs will be due by 5 PM on Friday afternoon (on marked weeks).  Because these assignments can be completed and turned in electronically, you cannot make these up.  Late blogs will be counted as zeroes.  I will be grading the completion of these blogs and responses twice—after the 5th entry (Sept. 28) and after the 10th entry (Nov. 9).  In addition, your blog entries will be used to create the Blog Story assignment at the end of the semester.

 

Reflections:  As a part of each of the assignments, you are required to turn in a reflection, in which you will describe how each assignment demonstrates your ability to apply the concepts and skills taught in this course—particularly 1) what your strengths and weaknesses were and how completing that assignment fulfills aspects of the WOVEN criteria.  For example, in oral presentations, you should discuss the ways your presentation addresses a specific listening audience and/or the strategic use of the voice, body, space, and technology.  You should always consider how your work changed for the better or worse between “drafts.”  Look at the Portfolio Information below (the chart) for more explanation.  I will provide the questionnaires that you will fill out after each assignment is turned in.

I will only be grading the completion of these reflections.  However, your responses will be revised and altered to create the portfolio assignment at the end of the semester.  At that point, they will be graded fully.

 Peer Review:

In this class, Drafts of the Research Poster, Blog Story, and Digital Storytelling Project as well as practice sessions for the Individual Storytelling project and the final presentation.

 

 Individual Storytelling:       15%

Goals:

  • Understand registers and variations within discourses.
  • Explore individual and collaborative processes in multicultural and international contexts.
  • Distinguish and evaluate multimodal communication —WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal).
  • Create WOVEN artifacts that demonstrate interpretation, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and judgment.

Your oral and nonverbal language need to

  • Show enthusiasm for your subject.
  • Show a variety of expression, multidimensionality, time-based language, awareness of kinesthetic imagery and utilize visual and aural imagery (as discussed by Lipman).

Your “content” will be graded on your coherence, structure, and appropriateness.

  • While your content does not have to be memorized per se, it does need to be smoothly told.

Preparation:

In preparation for this presentation, you should familiarize yourself with the readings from Ross and Lipman.

Requirements:

  • You will be enacting an individual storytelling “presentation.”  You will sign up for presentation times on Tuesday, Sept. 18.
  • Stories should be between 6 and 10 minutes.
  • You may either write a story or use a story that has already been written.  You will not be graded on the story itself (unless it is inappropriate in some manner or not actually a “story”).  You will be graded on your presentation style.

“Drafts”:  For this project, we will have several practice sessions during class (Sept. 11, 13, 18, 20).  For each of these sessions, you will write comments to help your peers improve.

Comments due by: Sept. 11, 13, 18, 20—end of class

10 Points each (completion)—count as assignments

Final Presentation:                         25 points

Due:  Presentations will take place Sept. 25 and 27.

Comments due by the evening of the presentations (Sept. 25 and 27).

Upload comments under Presentation

In this assignment, you will be graded on

  • Your oral storytelling
  • Your nonverbal storytelling

Grades will be determined holistically based on my observations and the observations of your peers.  We will create a rubric for this assignment in class using Ross and Lipman as guides.

 

Research Poster:  15%

Goals:

  •  “Understand rhetorical contexts for writing by establishing the writer’s role, the audience, and the purpose of the project.”
  • “Use conventions of writing mechanics, usage, and style to communicate effectively for the given audience, purpose, and format.”
  • Create artifacts that demonstrate the synergy of rhetorical elements.
  •  “Approach writing as a way to think and communicate ideas to others.”
  • “Use recursive processes that include collecting information, focusing, ordering, drafting, revising, and editing.”
  • “Demonstrate the techniques and skills of research, integration of source material, and documentation.”
  • Construct, select, and deploy information based on interpretation and critique of the accuracy, bias, credibility, authority, and appropriateness of sources.
  •  “Adjust writing to a variety of contexts, including electronic environments.”
  • “Read and respond to various texts for purposes of interpretation, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and judgment.”
  • Create WOVEN artifacts that demonstrate interpretation, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and judgment.

Requirements:  This poster must research the field of puppetry, its forms and its history, and provide a succinct and argumentative answer to the question:  Why puppetry?

As part of this project you must:

  • Create an argument that balances the use of images and text (remember that a poster is primarily a visual medium and plan accordingly).
  • Research one or more forms of puppetry, research the history of puppetry, and/or research a particular use for puppetry. While the internet is good, you need to move your research beyond, so make sure that you find
  • Use images as evidence to support your points.

The poster size should be: 7200 x 10800 pixels

Draft:

Due: Thursday, Oct. 25

10 Points (completion)—counts as an assignment

Comments due by: Sunday, Oct. 28

10 Points (completion)—counts as an assignment

Final Poster:                      100 points

Due: Tuesday, Oct. 30

Upload under Research Poster

Grades will be determined using the project’s rubric.

 

Blog “Story”:  20%

Goals:

  •  “Understand rhetorical contexts for writing by establishing the writer’s role, the audience, and the purpose of the project.”
  • “Use conventions of writing mechanics, usage, and style to communicate effectively for the given audience, purpose, and format.”
  • Understand registers and variations within discourses.
  • Create artifacts that demonstrate the synergy of rhetorical elements.
  • “Use recursive processes that include collecting information, focusing, ordering, drafting, revising, and editing.”
  • “Demonstrate the techniques and skills of research, integration of source material, and documentation.”
  • Explore individual and collaborative processes in multicultural and international contexts.
  • Construct, select, and deploy information based on interpretation and critique of the accuracy, bias, credibility, authority, and appropriateness of sources.
  •  “Adjust writing to a variety of contexts, including electronic environments.”
  • “Read and respond to various texts for purposes of interpretation, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and judgment.”
  • Distinguish and evaluate multimodal communication —WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal).
  • Create WOVEN artifacts that demonstrate interpretation, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and judgment.

Requirements:

Throughout the semester, you have been working on blogs for this class.  Your final assignment for this course is to clarify and to analyze the story of our class blog.

  • You can choose the medium in which your story appears.  It needs to be multi-modal.
  • Your story needs to coherently weave together segments of your blog and/or the blogs of your classmates with narrative and research.
  • Your story needs to argue for/analyze/discuss the benefits of storytelling.
  • This assignment has no length requirement, but if your story feels too long or too short, then you will lose points for rhetorical awareness—audiences never long things that feel too long or too short.  J

Draft:

Due: Monday, Nov. 12

10 Points (completion)—counts as an assignment

Comments due by: Wednesday, Nov. 14

10 Points (completion)—counts as an assignment

Final Product:                   100 points

Due: Friday, Nov. 16

Upload under Blog Story

Grades will be determined using the project’s rubric.

 

 Digital Storytelling Project:  20%

The methods of storytelling in the 21st century have expanded as new technologies allow for different mixtures of written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal communication.  In this group project, you and your groupmates will create a digital story.  You choose the story and the format.

Goals:

  •  “Understand rhetorical contexts for writing by establishing the writer’s role, the audience, and the purpose of the project.”
  • “Use conventions of writing mechanics, usage, and style to communicate effectively for the given audience, purpose, and format.”
  • Understand registers and variations within discourses.
  • Create artifacts that demonstrate the synergy of rhetorical elements.
  • “Use recursive processes that include collecting information, focusing, ordering, drafting, revising, and editing.”
  • Explore individual and collaborative processes in multicultural and international contexts.
  •  “Adjust writing to a variety of contexts, including electronic environments.”
  • “Read and respond to various texts for purposes of interpretation, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and judgment.”
  • Distinguish and evaluate multimodal communication —WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal).
  • Create WOVEN artifacts that demonstrate interpretation, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and judgment.

Preparation:

In preparation for this presentation, you should familiarize yourself with the internet “readings” on Digital Storytelling.

You may either write a story or use a story that has already been written.

“Draft”:

Due:  Tuesday, Nov. 20

For the draft, you need to turn in a storyboard of your Digital Story.

10 Points (completion)—counts as an assignment

Comments due by: Tuesday, Nov. 27 (beginning of class)

10 Points (completion)—counts as an assignment

Final Presentation:                         100 points

Due: Thursday, Nov. 29 (at the beginning of class)

Upload under Digital Storytelling Project (Everyone in the group must turn in all materials)

  • Project
  • Works Cited (if not included in the visual aid)
  • Collaboration Form (See below.)

Grades will be determined based on the project’s rubric.

 

Collaboration Form:  Answer the following questions thoroughly.

Name:  ____________________

Describe the quality and quantity of your participation in this group by answering the following questions.  Be honest.  Consider how much you and your group mates spoke up, offered productive or nonproductive conflict, asked questions, pushed beyond obvious interpretations, offered or asked for clarification, sat back and did nothing, just agreed with everyone without contributing, got off topic, stayed on topic, smoothed over tension, got on Facebook, were late or absent, etc.

1.  In what ways did you contribute to the group during the presentation preparation?

2.  In what ways did you hinder the group or hold back from the group? (Everyone does this in some way—don’t say you didn’t.)

3.  In what ways did your partner contribute to the group during the presentation preparation?

4.  In what ways did your partner hinder the group or hold back from the group? (Everyone does this in some way—don’t say he/she didn’t.)

5. Did you contribute [50% (for a group of 2)/33% (for a group of 3)], more, or less?  Explain.

6.  Did your partner(s) contribute [50% (for a group of 2)/33% (for a group of 3)], more, or less? Explain.

7. Do you believe that either you or one of your partners should lose points based on their participation in this project?  Why?

 

Portfolio:  5%

Requirements:

ENGL 1101/1102 Competency Portfolio

The end-of-semester portfolio is designed as a culminating, representative, and reflective sample of your work. In order to demonstrate that you have met the stated course goals, you will select evidence from the texts you have produced in this course (called artifacts); then, you will describe how each artifact demonstrates your ability to apply the concepts and skills taught in this course. Your portfolio will contain:

 

Mode Artifact(submitted as separate files) Reflection(complete the form)
Oral No electronic copy of the Oralpresentation is required. • the ways your presentation addresses a specific listening audience• the strategic use of the voice, body, space, and technology
Written • first draft• if pertinent, additional drafts• final draft • the differences between the first and final drafts• the ways the artifact uses more than alphabetic text to convey its message• successful composition strategies that might work well in other rhetorical situations
Visual • first• if pertinent, additional drafts• final draft • the differences between the first and final drafts• the ways the artifact uses more than alphabetic text to convey its message• successful composition strategies that might work well in other rhetorical situations
Electronic • first draft• if pertinent, additional drafts• final draft • the differences between the first and final drafts• the ways the artifact uses more than alphabetic text to convey its message• successful composition strategies that might work well in other rhetorical situations

 

NOTE: Retain copies of all drafts of your work in this course.

As described in the “English1101or1102.CompetencyPortfolio.Summer2009.docx” file, the entire portfolio—artifacts and reflection—will be used for program assessment. However, since I will have already graded your artifacts, I will only evaluate your reflection and the presence of the artifacts. This assignment counts as 5 % of your course grade.

(reproduced from the Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellowship Handbook 2009)

Types of Artifacts Appropriate for the Portfolio

The table below explains what we mean by written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal artifacts, and it indicates concepts of which students’ artifacts should demonstrate understanding.

 

Portfolio Contents Key Concepts
Written texts rely chiefly on printed words,typography, and layout.Examples: essays, analyses, reviews, articles, research papers • appeals (logos, pathos, ethos)                 • organization• audience-appropriate style                       • rebuttal• counterargument                                      • stance or thesis• development of ideas                               • transitions• supporting evidence• integrating and citing paraphrases, quotations, and long quotations• research using credible sources• use of headings, pull-outs, color, weight, images, captions, charts, graphs and other visual elements (see below) 
Oral (Aural) texts involve spoken words and sound effects, including music.Examples: presentations, videos, audio essays • concision                                                 • cultural awareness• forecasting or signposting                       • hesitations or ummery• pace                                                        • tone• repetition                                                 • volume• rhythm                                                     • transitions
Visual texts foreground image and design.Examples: posters, brochures, videos • alignment                                                • closure• contrast                                                  • cropping• figure/ground contrast                            • font manipulation• framing                                                   • proximity• repetition or consistency                        • visual tropes• integrating and citing charts, graphs, etc.• integrating and citing images
Electronic texts leverage interactive features of digital media and combine several modes.Examples: Web sites, wikis, discussionboards, blogs, animations, games • audience-awareness• chunking• conventions• hyperlinking• layout• navigation• social context• technical constraints
Nonverbal texts use the body, spacing, and timing. • chronemics                         • eye-gaze• gesture                               • haptics• kinesics                              • paralanguage• posture                               • proxemics

(reproduced from the Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellowship Handbook 2009)

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