Storytelling By Images

I recently discovered Pinterest and immediately fell in love with it.  It’s ridiculously entertaining to “pin” my interests and stare at the amazing images others have pinned.
Just like Facebook or Twitter, Pinterest tells a story, but it does so in a much more subtle way. Companies, for example, can display images that tell a story about how amazing their product is, though there are few posts that directly advertise.

The image below tells a story about a young woman out and about the city. She is having a wonderful time sight-seeing. (And her Vera Bradley hipster certainly appears to make her life easier.)
Image via http://insidestitch.com/2012/07/27/chicago-travel/

Just like Facebook or Twitter, Pinterest tells a story, but it does so in a much more subtle way. Companies, for example, can display images that tell a story about how amazing their product is, though there are few posts that directly advertise.

This image tells a story about a young woman out and about the city. She is having ga wonderful time sight-seeing. (And her Vera Bradley hipster certainly appears to make her life easier.)

I came across an article online that described this type of advertising on Pinterest. One can use Pinterest to “display an image to identify the story of every board,” and “pins of nostalgia, beaches, food and vintage fashion that appear to be independently unrelated, manage to tell the story of a brand.” [nbcite refID=”1″ refName=”Reference Name” type=”blog” title=”Pinterest Changes Improve Storytelling” title_periodical=”Edelman Digital” year=”2012″ month=”May” day=”1″ url=”http://www.edelmandigital.com/2012/05/01/pinterest-changes-improve-storytelling/” year_access=”2012″ author=”Diana Kelter”] (And in my opinion, advertising through stories in images is far less annoying than, say, a pop-up advertisement.)
Pinterest also tells individual stories. A person’s interests, hobbies, and sense of humor are highlighted by the types of images they pin. Again, a story is told about a person’s life, but these stories are through images instead of words, as with Facebook or Twitter. The board covers hint at the story within a particular board, and each board tells a story. I think of the boards dedicated to travel, which tell the story of where a pinner has visited. Or the boards that tell the stories of the movies someone enjoyed or the books they’ve read.

A story of where an individual has traveled and would like to travel is displayed via Pinterest.

Once you become aware of it, you realize just how important story is to all aspects of social media. Pinterest provides snapshots of people’s stories, and I’m excited to see the new stories I’ll continue to discover.

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3 Responses to Storytelling By Images

  1. Vincent Paglioni says:

    I have NEVER understood the fascination behind Pinterest, but this explained it perfectly. It is very interesting (to some, not necessarily to me) to see the story of someone’s life told in just pictures — you can tell a lot about a person from their interests.

  2. Gina Yu says:

    I agree that Pinterest conveys a story; it’s like reading between the lines. You see the photographs and pins, and you can infer about the person even though its not explicitly stated. For example, you would be able to tell someone was really into baking if they pinned lots of baking projects and ideas.

  3. Tannyr Pasvantis says:

    Pinterest is relatively new to me, but I definitely use it as a way to show what kinds of things I like on different boards, so essentially I do use it to tell my story. I had never thought of it like that, but it is fascinating. Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter, even StumbleUpon, they are all mediums to express your interests and thus your own personal story.

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