My All-Time Favorite Picture Book

Green Eggs and Ham, a picture book by Dr. Seuss, is my all-time favorite. I remember going to the library almost every day as a kid to ask the librarian to read it to me. I even almost learn it, as it has lots of catchy rhymes. The book is about Sam-I-Am, who is the main character, trying to convince the narrator of the book to try his green eggs and ham. By offering different scenarios and dining partners to the narrator, Sam-I-Am ends up convincing him to try his green eggs and ham at the end of the book. In a deeper aspect, the book shows how experience is important when someone is making a judgement; the narrator realized he loved green eggs and ham once he finally tried them.

 

This book’s pages consist of small texts, which always rhyme, as well as of extravagant pictures filled with little details. For example, look at the following picture:

 

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“Could you, would you, with a goat?” “I would not, could not, with a goat!” The rhymes make the reading so fun! They make it impossible for one not to read it out loud. Also, since it has very few text, one can concentrate more on the drawings, which is the other fun element the book contains, besides the rhymes. This page of the book is my favorite because it reminds me of the Doctor Seuss’s Disney ride, which is in a crazy train like the one drawn. Dr. Seuss is characterized for his weird, extravagant, crazy pictures. For example, he painted the mountains red. That sort of thing gets one’s attention, since the more the kid reads the book, the more details he finds, and the more he or she loves the book. Pictures are also very detailed. One can see the goat and the narrator in black and white, and Sam-I-Am with his green eggs and ham in color. I think Dr. Seuss tries to represent positivism with color and negativism without it. Another thing that gets my attention in this picture is movement. The train seems to be falling down the continuous roller coaster, and it’s so fun for kids to see that!

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8 Responses to My All-Time Favorite Picture Book

  1. Sean Joplin says:

    I think that sounds are one of the most important aspects of a picture book. Kids don’t really care about story so much as how it sounds, which is why I think Dr. Seuss is so popular. All of his books have a easily rememberable rhythm and rhyme because he often times would make up his own words. Kids love when people make up words, especially simple sounding words. The pictures, as you mentioned did a great job at conveying excitement and motion which also makes for exciting story time. Dr. Seuss will alway be a great example for who to model for children’s books. I like how simple his pictures are. They are not as busy as one would expect. People would expect that kids would love for there to be tons of characters and a lot going on, but as long as you have one or two characters doing something funny, the child will laugh.

  2. Caleb McCullough says:

    I agree that the Dr. Seuss and his extravagant nature is an awesome way to relate to both child and adult audiences. The wildness of both his rhymes and his illustrations make it an entertaining experience for everyone involved. Like most of his books it features a set of extremely strange settings and characters so the rhymes are often nearly nonsensical tied loosely by an overall purpose in the book. This gives an unpredictability and an excitement to reading it as it always pleasantly surprises with how strangely creative it is. To the children this is a source of outstanding laughter, and to the adult it is deeply amusing because very few things in the adult world are so outlandish. The illustrations have a similar effect. Because of the wild colors, completely impossible occurrences and wacky settings both adult and child find themselves deeply entertained by situations like the aforementioned train riding down the world’s most unstable tracks, or the peculiar way shapes and objects are illustrated.

  3. Cameron Small says:

    I was also a fan of Dr. Seuss when I was in elementary school. I think his books by far are the most fun to read out loud. I agree with your remarks on Dr. Seuss’ use of color in his books, as most of his characters are usually in less bright colors (Sam-I-Am), and some objects are bright colors (the eggs and ham, mountains, train car). I think this is his way of distinguishing what is ordinary and what is extraordinary in his books. In this case the extraordinary were the things being perpetuated by Dr. Seuss and the ordinary was Sam-I-Am. The same use of color is seen in the book Olivia by Ian Falconer. In it, all of Olivia’s things are colored red, while almost everything else in the book is in black and white. I think this is a great way to help kids focus on the important elements in picture book because some kids tend to get distracted by the pictures and don’t read the text. By using color in this way in our picture books, we can keep the attention of our audience for a longer time. I also think rhyming helps keep kids focused on the text more as well.

  4. Edwin Lopez says:

    Dr. Seuss made some amazing picture books, and this is one of his best. The rhyme and rhythm keep the reader engaged, and as you mentioned in your post, the pictures are very detailed. They stand out because of the bright and vibrant colors that they consist of. Something that I wonder is why Dr. Seuss uses a lot of white space in this picture book. While too much white space usually makes a picture book dull, it effectively helped me stay engaged in this book. Maybe it’s because the red and blue truly stand out with a white background, and they would be less vibrant if the sky was light blue or something like that. In regards to the overall theme of the importance of experience, the book definitely persuaded me to try green eggs and ham. I was always curious about how one could eat green eggs.
    “Where do you get green eggs?”
    “Are green eggs healthy?”
    My mom finally spilled the beans on a “Have Lunch with Your Child Day” in which we had green eggs and ham. She told me about a magical substance called food coloring…

    I never read Green Eggs and Ham the same way again, but I still love it.

  5. Jacob Blevins says:

    Sorry about the double post! The one I meant to post is the one directly below this.

  6. Jacob Blevins says:

    Dr. Seuss’ “Green Eggs and Ham” is a classic. As one of the most well known children’s picture books in America and probably around most of the world, I’ve always wondered how such a simple and weird idea could become so big. I agree with you that it has a very catchy rhyme to its words; if this was only a poem and did not include pictures, it would still be an attractive piece to read. Nevertheless, Seuss does add pictures to the already great poem. These pictures ignite the imagination and create something that has never been thought of or seen before in any of the world’s creative minds. I agree that there is a large amount of small, quality detail that make the illustrations enticing to readers of all ages. You claim that Dr. Seuss’ creativity is shown in the weird drawings such as the red mountains. I believe it is the combination of different things of this world into a children’s picture book, such as the red mountains, that entices the readers of all ages to enjoy this book so much that it has become one of the most well known children’s books in history.

  7. Jacob Blevins says:

    Dr. Seuss’ “Green Eggs and Ham” is a classic. As one of the most well known children’s picture books in America and probably around most of the world, I’ve always wondered how such a simple and weird idea could become so big. They even make songs and plays about it and stick in my head to this day. I agree with you that it has a very catchy rhyme to its words; if this was only a poem and did not include pictures, it would still be an attractive piece to read. Nevertheless, Seuss does add pictures to the already great poem. These pictures ignite the imagination and create something that has never been thought of or seen before in any of the world’s creative minds. I agree that there is a large amount of small, quality detail that make the illustrations enticing to readers of all ages. You claim, which I believe to be true, that Dr. Seuss’ creativity is shown in the weird drawings such as the red mountains. I believe it is the combination of different things of this world into a children’s picture book, such as the red mountains, that entices the readers of all ages to enjoy this book so much that it has become one of the most well known children’s books in history.

  8. Alexander Lopez says:

    This book was also one of my favorite picture books a kid. I agree with you that Dr. Seuss’s unique art style and brilliant rhyme scheme definitely draw kids in, but I also believe both factors improve the reading experience for the adults as well. The constant rhyming keeps them mentally engaged while subtle drawing details, such as the red mountains and rickety train tracks, stick out to them on the page. One of the other factors you noticed is that Sam-I-Am is bright yellow whereas the other main character is not. In the actual print version of the book, I believe the other character (whose name I cannot remember) is actually a dull shade of yellow. I definitely believe Dr. Seuss choose the color scheme to reflect the personalities of both Sam-I-Am and the other character. Sam-I-Am is bright and vivid to show his energy and excitement. The other character is dull to show his stuck up and boring personality. These are the types of details that the adults may notice as the read the book, but to the kids, they just see goofy pictures.

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